Angry boss with employee

8 Lame Phrases Bad Bosses Say

Some employers tend to underestimate the effect of their words and expressions on the morale of their workers. The truth is that what managers say and how they say it impacts employee engagement and loyalty, to the point when the supervisor’s comments become the prime motive for leaving the company. Here are some examples of things responsible employers should never say to their workers.

1. If you don’t like your job, fine – there are dozens of candidates willing to take your position at the company.

This phrase destroys employee morale into tiny pieces. Workers who hear these words are likely to think less about completing the tasks at hand and more about looking for a stable position.

2. You should be happy that I gave you this job. Not every company would have the time and patience to invest in you.

Employees should never be condemned for their faults – it certainly won’t encourage them to perform their tasks better. No employer should ever make their employees feel like a burden to the company.

3. Why should I invest in your training? You’ll just take all this knowledge and go to work for someone else.

Nevermind the great value of employee training, this phrase can never be uttered by a trusted employer. All it shows is lack of trust and an extremely egoist attitude towards disseminating industry know-how. No employee would want to stay in a company that avoids investing in staff development.

No employee would want to stay in a company that avoids investing in staff development.

4. You’re paid to do, not to think.

This is probably one of the worst phrases one can hear from an employer. It combines all that’s ugly about a bad employer-employee relationship – lack of trust or respect for the worker’s qualifications and knowledge, instrumental treatment of the worker and dismissive attitude towards any possible suggestions brought forward by the employee. This effectively blocks all communication between an employee and manager, quenching the former’s engagement and enthusiasm for the job.

5. Is that the best you can do?

This question combines condemnation and lack of respect enveloped in a fairly powerful insult. Instead of resorting to such phrases, employers should make their expectations clear from the very beginning and show workers how they want things to be done. This kind of question will simply get them nowhere.

6. No other employee had similar problems in completing this task.

This phrase is an instance of unfair judging and comparing employees, which isn’t effective and essentially doesn’t inspire them to do their job better. Managers should be patient and always ready to help struggling workers to get on with their tasks. Lack of training or unclear instructions given to employees is the always the employer’s fault.

Lack of training or unclear instructions given to employees is the always the employer’s fault.

7. That’s a stupid idea.

Brainstorming works because it gives everyone an opportunity to speak their mind and collectively develop the best ideas and solutions. If employees are afraid of being insulted, they simply won’t be eager to share their ideas. A pleasant environment, where ideas (good and bad) are tossed around freely is the one where great things happen.

8. I can’t give you a detailed performance feedback right now, but you’re doing fine. If you don’t, I’ll tell you.

Every great manager should be able to provide insightful and detailed feedback about their employee’s work. Workers simply deserve to know what exactly they’re doing great and which aspects of their performance could benefit from additional training. Having a clear idea about their strengths and weaknesses, good employers are able to direct workers into the right opportunities for professional development.

 

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Monique Craig is a tech blogger and marketing specialist, who works for Oneflare, an Australian online marketplace, which connects customers with service providers.

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